Airbus Military, Astrium and Cassidian are now Airbus Defence and Space

Astrium

A helping hand from space

Astrium is supporting projects that act against climate change by supplying Earth observation imagery, software and expertise. An essential helping hand for those striving to preserve our planet.

150 million inhabitants: this is the number of ‘climate-change refugees’ that could potentially be forced to leave their homes and countries by the end of this century; victims of flooding in Bangladesh and the Nile Delta, the expansion of the Gobi desert or the submersion of the South Sea Islands.

Simply theory? A look at the facts may change your mind: the first climate-change refugees were registered back in 2005 when 10 families inhabiting the Carteret Atoll had to flee their islands, largely engulfed by the rising seas, and seek refuge in Papua New Guinea.

And yet … And yet, for years now, incredibly powerful means of observation have been deployed to scrutinise the Earth’s surface, the oceans, the atmosphere and ice formations to provide scientists and the authorities with data on the evolving situation. Satellites. The information obtained from satellites has already enabled us to calculate that ocean levels have been rising by approximately 3 mm a year since 1992. Based on this concrete data, the most pessimistic forecasts estimate that sea levels will rise 90 cm by 2100, posing an immediate and direct threat to cities like London, no less …

As they wait for international political awareness to catch up, NGOs the world over are finding support in the form of space agencies. Astrium is already up there playing a part with its Planet Action portal. It is supporting projects that act against climate change by supplying Earth observation imagery, software and expertise. An essential helping hand for those striving to preserve our planet.